Charles Kenney

Associate Professor of Political Science
225 Dale Hall Tower
325-3735
ckenney@ou.edu

Curriculum Vitae

B.A., University of Notre Dame, 1980
M.A., University of Notre Dame, 1997
Ph.D., University of Notre Dame, 1998

Teaching and Research Interests:  Comparative Politics, Latin American Politics, Politics in Developing Countries, Democratization, Democratic Theory, Executive-Legislative Relations, Political Parties, Electoral Systems, and Political Violence

Charles Kenney is an Associate Professor at University of Oklahoma, where he has taught Government and Politics of Latin America and the International Relations of Latin America since 1997. Dr. Kenney lived in Peru from 1978-79 and 1984-1991, received his Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Notre Dame in 1998, was a Fulbright Fellow at the Pontificia Universidad Católica in 2000, and is the past chair of the Peru Section of the Latin American Studies Association. He was a member of the Latin American Studies Association delegation of international electoral observers for the 2000 Peruvian elections and the National Democratic Institute and Carter Center joint international observation mission in 2001.

He has published Fujimori's Coup and the Breakdown of Democracy in Latin America (University of Notre Dame Press 2004), articles in Comparative Political Studies, Party Politics, PostData, Elecciones, Estudios de Filosofía, Areté, Páginas, and chapters in books edited by Oxford University Press and the Frederich Ebert Foundation. His primary areas of interest include democratization, constitutional design, electoral and party systems, and Peruvian politics.

Current Research:  Primary areas of interest include democratization, constitutional design, electoral and party systems, and Peruvian politics. Related areas of interests include comparative politics, politicaliInstitutions, Latin American politics, Latin American international relations, politics in developing countries, political parties, executive-legislative relations, breakdown of democratic regimes, political violence, democratic theory, political theory, authoritarianism, ethics and politics, human rights, and transitional justice.